Omí Lana

by Obá Oriaté Willie Ramos, Ilarí Obá
Begins: June, 2014 (beginning the first Sunday in June)
Cost: $25 a class, payable in advance, on a monthly basis

This seminar, open to all duly ordained Lukumí olorishas, is indispensable. The growing degree of almost total unfamiliarity exhibited by olorishas during our religious ceremonies is disturbing, given the significant growth Lukumí religion has experienced in the past 50 years. The number of myths and legends that have originated because of this ignorance is even more disturbing. This course will provide the necessary foundations for the olorisha by explaining not only the ritual processes, but also the significance and historical basis for these. It is an essential class for all serious olorishas.

The seminar will provide a theoretical understanding of all aspects of the Lukumí ordination ceremony, including the preparatory stages and the procedures followed throughout the various rituals. Although many of the elements that shall be discussed throughout the duration of the seminar are intrinsically linked with the role and functions of the Obá Oriaté, this course will not qualify anyone as an Obá Oriaté.

The classes will run for approximately 6 months, though the length may vary according to the group and its level of commitment. Though this is not a Dilogún seminar, we will cover aspects related with the oracle, and especially the ebó. Participants are expected to learn the ebó in its entirety.

Space is limited so act quickly, but please do not reserve a space if you are not serious about taking the course. Click here to access our registration form: Register. If the link does not work, copy and paste this address to your browser’s search bar: https://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?hl=en&formkey=dFZ0YlNpNnRaWVNDcHpUNENtZEY4akE6MA.

You must provide your full birth and osha names, date and place of initiation, names of godparents, plus the name and contact information for TWO olorishas that can verify your status as an olorisha. References are a MUST. Without this verification, you CANNOT participate.

Once your information is verified, and the definite start date is determined, you will be required to pay an initial $50.00, NON-REFUNDABLE deposit through Eleda.Org, using Paypal. Once the deposit is made, we will send you the course description and forms that you will need to sign and return to us along with the balance for the first month’s classes.

To participate, all participants MUST have a gmail address. Sign up for one asap—it is free of charge—if you don’t already have one, because the system we use for the seminar will not work with other email servers.

Sólo para olorishas lukumíes iniciados

Comienza Noviembre 5, 2013
Martes, de 7:30 a 9:30 P.M.
Límite: 30 personas
Costo: $20.00 por clase, si la toma en vivo o $22.50 si participa por Skype. Esta suma debe ser pagada por adelantado mensualmente, al comienzo de cada mes. Continue reading »

Barry Irving, with more than 40 years of experience as an artist.

To see more of his work, contact the artist: storymaster1614@yahoo.com

IrvingOshumare2

CLOSED
Lecture 2: Herbs and the Odu Oshé
Date: Sunday, April 28, 2013
Time: 1 PM
Cost: $50 (in-class participation); $55 for Google+ participants
We will be able to host nine (9) participants via Google+. All others must attend the session in person. Continue reading »

Sunday, March 10, 2013
1 to 4 p.m.
Cost: $50 (in-class participation); $55 for Google+ participants
We will be able to host nine (9) participants via Google+. All others must attend the session in person. Continue reading »

obiagbonMiami: Eleda.Org Publications, 2012. ISBN: 978-1-877845-11-6. (290 pgs.) $24.99.
Available through
Eleda.Org, Barnesandnoble.com or Amazon.com

Obí Agbón is a ground-breaking exploration of Lukumí (Yoruba) divination with coconut and its historical evolution in Cuba and the Cuban diaspora. This study reviews the existing scholarship on the topic, offering critical and profound observations that are of major importance and relevance to the state of affairs of Lukumí religion in the XXIst century.

In the process of analyzing the primary subject, the author book examines some of the more salient debates, internal discrepancies and worrisome, unprecedented trends that have challenged the Lukumí community through the years, and continue to do so in the modern context. Furthermore, while not dismissing the role of mythology and tradition, the author’s exploration presents a series of fundamental considerations, significant for both devotees and the scholarship, which are founded upon historical archival evidence as well as oral “texts”—the accounts of the members of the Lukumí community themselves. In the process, the reader gains valuable insight about the role of human capriciousness and inventiveness that so often lead to confusion, discrepancies and contention amongst Olorishas, and repeatedly upset or alter religious practice.

The author’s dominion of the subject matter is supported by four decades of active participation as an Olorisha and Obá Oriaté, in the religion that has been part of his own family tradition for at least four generations. Moreover, fieldwork in Cuba and the Cuban diaspora, scholarly research and publications, participation in many conferences and symposiums, and contributions to several museum exhibitions, corroborate the author’s expertise and command of the topic. Surely, Obí Agbón will be an invaluable guide for the Olorisha and an important contributor to the scholarly literature on Lukumí religion.

Given the book’s strong foundations, this study will certainly—and hopefully—lead to other levels of discussion that are of extreme importance given the growth, expansion and continual transformation of the Lukumí religion since the Cuban Revolution, which has allowed the religious system to respond to the needs of greater and significantly diverse national and ethnic communities that have joined its ranks. Undoubtedly, all forms of Yoruba religion are living traditions that, by their very nature, cannot remain static. Stagnation clearly presages the system’s demise. As a “living” entity, the Lukumí faith will—in fact, must—continually grow and evolve, actively and incessantly encompassing those elements that expand the religion’s character and applicability to the modern world, while simultaneously supporting its perpetuity.

As Lukumí and all variants of Yoruba religion continue ascending as universal faiths, the custodians of each tradition
have a responsibility and an obligation to safeguard the religion’s essential core, whether or not its margins pursue (hopefully) positive interaction with the other traditions. Ultimately, whether these custodians accept or reject any transformative movements is immaterial, given the unrelenting character of the natural evolution that the various traditions must inevitably follow to respond to the modern world. At these junctions, it is vital that the community guarantees the constant and unremitting scrutiny of the fundamental components that make up the religions’ core as these elements interact with the concerns, changes and directions that will shape ritual and practice for generations to come. This book contributes to the ongoing debate, but most importantly if does so by ensuring that actively defending and guarding a religious legacy that must withstand the test of time and unremittingly demonstrate its capacity to advance beyond the obstacles that it encounters in its journey.

Date: Nov. 18, 2012
1 – 4 pm
$50.00 Local S. Florida Residents
$55 Online Google + participation (limit 9 people)
Reserve now Continue reading »

Lecture 1: Herbs and the Odu Ofún
Date: October 14, 2012
Time: 1 PM
Cost: $50 (in-class participation); $55 for Skype participants
We will be able to host nine (9) participants via Skype. All others must attend the session in person.
SKYPE PARTICIPATION IS FULL

This series will help the serious olorisha to establish well-founded theoretical and practical perspectives and knowledge about herbs and their usage in Lukumí Orisha Worship.

Our first lecture will discuss the proscriptions and prescriptions related with the Odu Ofún and several of the Odu’s defense mechanisms through the use of herbs and ebó ewé ní l’ara—ritual or purificatory baths. Though the class will be vital for all participants interested in founding solid foundations about herbs and odu, this class will be of special interest to those olorishas who have Ofún as their guiding odu. Don’t miss it.

Space is limited so act quickly, but please do not reserve if you are not serious about taking the class.

All those interested in participating must send register by filling out the form available through ELEDA.ORG. You must provide your full birth and osha names, date and place of initiation, names of godparents, plus the name and contact information for TWO olorishas that can verify your status as an olorisha. References are a MUST. Without this verification, you CANNOT participate.

Once your information is verified, you will be asked to pay an initial $25.00, NON-REFUNDABLE deposit through Eleda.Org, using Google Wallet. The balance must be paid before September 30, 2012. Failure to do so could cost you your seat in the class and the loss of your deposit.

REGISTER NOW

By Obá Oriaté Miguel “Willie” Ramos, Ilarí Obá

The book has been expanded to include other adimús and photos of prepared orisha foods that have been offered in actual rituals.
Release Date: July 25, 2012
Cost: $21.99 + S&H
Available through Eleda.Org and Amazon.com Continue reading »

For ordained Olorishas only (proof or ordination is required)

Sunday, August 5th, 2012
1:00 – 5:00 pm
Open to classroom and Skype participation
Cost: $50.00 ($55.00 for Skype participation)
Reservations are required. Once confirmed, a $25.00 deposit will also be necessary to reserve your seat.
Limits: 25 students in class & 9 via Skype Continue reading »

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